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as republicans have been trying to do since 2005 when we passed the deficit reduction act. >> let me jump to that, because part of the intriguing thing here is the fact that congressman cole, he is doing something that the president said, that post election news conference and that is, you know, extend the tax cut for everyone, but the wealthy, and then, you know, after you get that done, and i don't know if you would be going along with that, but nevertheless, you know, go ahead, talk about this long-term deal that would involve possible cuts as i think you're getting at, you know, cuts to programs like medicare. is that something we could see taking shape here? >> you're talking about getting rid of redundancies. great example, 342 economic development programs that are in the federal government system. let's start cleaning up these redundancies. let's do some of these across the board cuts in discretionary spending. let's make certain that medicare and social security, which are trust funds, not entitlements, they're trust funds, that they meet their obligation to our seniors and near seniors.
on a comprehensive plan to bring down our deficits, to streamline our tax system, to do it in a balanced way, including asking the wealthiest americans to pay a little more so we can invest in training, education, science, and research. now, i know some of this may sound familiar to you because we talked a lot about this during the campaign. this shouldn't be a surprise to anybody. this was a major debate in the presidential campaign and in congressional campaigns all across the country and a clear majority of americans, not just democrats but also a lot of republicans and a lot of independents agreed we should have a balanced approach to deficit reduction that doesn't hurt the economy and doesn't hurt middle class families. and i'm glad to see, if you've been reading the papers lately, that more and more republicans in congress seem to be agreeing with this idea that we should have a balanced approach. so if both parties agree we should not raise taxes on middle class families, let's begin our work with where we agree. the senate's already passed a bill that keeps income taxes from going up
're willing to close tax loopholes to reduce the deficit, now we haven't yet seen that from congressional republican leaders, but we obviously are seeing it from prominent republicans you showed including senator graham and senator bob corker. >> question about two of those gentlemen here in a moment. cnn this morning talked to grover norquist, incumbents dare to break this pledge, dare to vote to raise taxes. the question was will he do it again? here's norquist. >> we would certainly highlight who has kept their commitment and who hasn't, but the point is historically the people who lose do so because the people in their state have figured that out. >> back to, i think, where you were going a moment ago, bob, it is interesting that when you look at the top two, two of the top republican senators we're talking about who are flirting to break this pledge, break with grover norquist and consider raising taxes on the wealthy they both face re-election in 2014. i'm talking about saxby chambliss and south carolina's lindsey graham. does that say to you that the political winds could be shifti
's happening at that moment in time. and if you have -- if you have a rising deficit and you have a country where the economy is stagnating you may have to, in the short term or for longer periods of time raise revenue and you may have to do that through raising taxes. so to have ever taken that position was an extreme position. >> so lawmakers, we're talking about peter king, lindsey graham being the latest ones today, to say they might consider abandoning that no tax hike pledge, similar to how senator saxby chambliss said he would abandon the pledge for the american people. yes, they may have been extreme positions but for a long time most of these lawmakers didn't feel it was extreme, they felt it was the necessary thing to do, they were digging in heels for a very long time. so it does seem hike an incredible page that's being turned here to be able to now say, i'll consider abandoning that. it does seem like there is maybe an olive branch that's being extended? >> i think turning back to a reasonable position is not the same as saying that i'm being moderate. what we are seeing in our
that help the economy, and the deficit. raising the ceiling on the debt. my feeing is they probably can go past january 1 but not far past it. and still not fall off the cliff. around january 15th. >> so now if there are to be some real groundwork laid by congress as they return after the holiday weekend, what really needs to get done, if we look at over the next six weeks, even though you say we've got past january 1, what should they try to accomplish this week? >> well, i think they need to start to spell out spending cuts. i mean, the president has made clear what he wanted in the way of additional revenue and there are a couple of different ways of getting there. now the president has to talk about the spending cuts that he is willing to accept. he needs to give republicans cover to come on board. right now, the list of republicans that are willing to come on board is very short. and he's just not going to get there with that list. he needs to talk specifically about how he's going to deal with entitlements. >> and then what happens to the average american family? if we were to go ove
the deficit. let's have a comprehensive approach here that is a serious approach, no more kicking the can down the road. let's do it for real this time. >> fewer contortions usually better. i think we can all agree on that. anna navarro, great to see you any time of day. >>> all right, guys, here's the score card for the no tax pledge. 238 house members and 41 senators have signed the pledge. of those, only three are actually democrats and two of those three democrats will be out of office in january. i love the holidays. and with my bankamericard cash rewards credit card, i love 'em even more. i earn 1% cash back everywhere, every time. 2% on groceries. 3% on gas. automatically. no hoops to jump through. that's 1% back on... [ toy robot sounds ] 2% on pumpkin pie. and apple. 3% back on 4 trips to the airport. it's as easy as... -[ man ] 1... -[ woman ] 2... [ woman ] 3. [ male announcer ] the bankamericard cash rewards card. apply online or at a bank of america near you. >>> so the heated debate over the possible elimination of susan rice as secrety of state appears to be cooling off. you'll
or have less of a deficit is to let the economy grow. raising tax rates on rich people will not help the economy grow. in fact, it will send the economy in the wrong direction. >> i understand. i know you signed a pledge and you're sticking to that pledge with regard to the people you represent. so let me move on and ask you this, senator. you have indicated you are interested in running for president. tell me this, here, how exactly -- how interested are you and have you taken -- i know you smile because you've been asked it before, but let me ask you as well, have you taken any concrete actions to start lining up support? honest answer, please. >> well, you know, i've said i won't deny that i'm interested. little bit different than i am interested. >> let's read between the lines. what does that mean, sir? >> i want to be part of the national debate. i think my party, the republican party is shrinking. we're in danger of becoming a dinosaur. we're not competitive on the west coast. we're not competitive in new england. we weren't competitive around the great lakes. so we need a new
deficit. and i know we have seen this morning also several editorial writers indicate the same, that it is important that we put these drivers of the deficit on the table and include them as part of any agreement to avoid the fiscal cliff. as the speaker said, we have done our part. we have put revenues on the table, something that we didn't do two years ago during the debt ceiling negotiations. we still believe that it is most important for us to address the economic situation in this country where so many people are out of work. and that's why we take the position and believe strongly that increasing marginal rates is income tax rates is not the way to produce growth and to put people back to work. but we have not seen any good faith effort on the part of this administration to talk about the real problem that we're trying to fix. i'm told that mr. bolz, some of us will meet with him later today, has said earlier this morning that there's been no serious discussion by the white house on entitlements on medicare and medicaid. this has to be a part of this agreement or else we
in an opinion piece this week that the president's health care reform must be included in deficit negotiations. >>> before you tell your kids a story of christmas, listen up. the pope is out with a new book, and it debunks a lot of details about jesus' birth. more on that later on this hour. >> here on the help desk we're talking about paying down debt and saving for the future. with me this hour are greg olson and carmen. greg, this question is for you. suzanne told us the more she spends on paying off her debt, the less she has to save. >> how do we balance between saving for the future and paying down some credit card debt? >> you know, those bills come in, and you see that debt, and your eyes just pop out of your head. >> it's an easy question, but i'm very glad she asked it because it's something that most people get wrong. unless you have an introductory rate or you're paying a sfwler 0% introductory rate and have the ability to transfer that in the future, low credit card debt rates are considered 12% right now. show me where you can get an investment that's going to net on an after tax
a handle on the deficit. it also has a lot of people saying wait a minute. some of these decisions could really impact -- and not a good way -- have a huge impact on the poor and elderly. for ceo lloyd blankfein, he did an interview over the weekend with cbs and made the case that the social safety net programs need to be scaled back like medicare, medicaid and social security. he says people need to lower their expectations of those sboi entitlements. easy for him to say. he made about $12 million last year. i digress. he did con socede that eventual the way to raise revenue will be for the wealthy to pay a higher tax rate. david coney is talking about addressing the entitlement issue but wants a corporate tax rate of zero. no doubt that would create huge outrage. he says that's the most effective way to create jobs in the u.s. and frees up so much money for companies to hire. many would probably agree that's important, too. you can see both sides of the story there, carol. one more extreme than the other, of course. >> of course. we'll see what happens. alison kosik at the new york sto
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10

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